Archive | November, 2014

Drawing of a Young August Wilson

24 Nov

young-august-wilsonBy Mike Downing

I found this online today and thought it was awesome.

Click the image to visit the website.

 

“August Wilson: The Ground On Which I Stand” to premiere on American Masters, February 20, 2015

24 Nov

wilson_portrait_500By Mike Downing

“August Wilson: The Ground On Which I Stand” is scheduled to premiere on American Masters on February 20, 2015. For air dates and times, check your local PBS listings.

 

I Want A Black Director

17 Nov

August Wilson 14By August Wilson

“I Want a Black Director”

From IndieWire.com

“I don’t want to hire nobody just ’cause they’re black.” Eddie Murphy said that to me. We were discussing the possibility of Paramount Pictures purchasing the rights to my play “Fences.” I said I wanted a black director for the film. My response [to his remark] was immediate. “Neither do I,” I said.

What Mr. Murphy meant I am not sure. I meant I wanted to hire somebody talented, who understood the play and saw the possibilities of the film, who would approach my work with the same amount of passion and measure of respect with which I approach it, and who shared the cultural responsibilities of the characters.

That was more than three years ago. I have not talked to Mr. Murphy about the subject since. Paramount did purchase rights to make the film in 1987. What I thought of as a straightforward, logical request has been greeted by blank, vacant stares and the pious shaking of heads as if in response to my unfortunate naiveté.

I usually have had to repeat my request, “I want a black director,” as though it were a complex statement in a foreign tongue. I have often heard the same response: “We don’t want to hire anyone just because they are black.” What is being implied is that the only qualification any black has is the color of his skin.

In the film industry, the prevailing attitude is that a black director couldn’t do the job, and to insist upon one is to make the film “unmakeable,” partly because no one is going to turn a budget of $15 million over to a black director. That this is routinely done for novice white directors is beside the point.

The ideas of ability and qualification are not new to blacks. The skills of black lawyers, doctors, dentists, accountants and mechanics are often greeted with skepticism, even from other blacks. “Man, you sure you know what you doing?”

At the time of my last meeting with Paramount, in January 1990, a well-known, highly respected white director wanted very much to direct the film. I don’t know his work, but he is universally praised for sensitive and intelligent direction. I accept that he is a very fine film director. But he is not black. He is not a product of black American culture-a culture that was honed out of the black experience and fired in the kiln of slavery and survival – and he does not share the sensibilities of black Americans.

I have been asked if I am not, by rejecting him on the basis of his race, doing the same thing Paramount is doing by not hiring a black director. That is a fair, if shortsighted, question which deserves a response.

I am not carrying a banner for black directors. I think they should carry their own. I am not trying to get work for black directors. I am trying to get the film of my play made in the best possible way.

As Americans of various races, we share a broad cultural ground, a commonality of society that links its diverse elements into a cohesive whole that can be defined as “American.”

We share certain mythologies. A history. We share political and economic systems and a rapidly developing, if suspect, ethos. Within these commonalities are specifics. Specific ideas and attitudes that are not shared on the common cultural ground. These remain the property and possession of the people who develop them, and on that “field of manners and rituals of intercourse” (to use James Baldwin’s eloquent phrase) lives are played out.

At the point where they intercept and link to the broad commonality of American culture, they influence how that culture is shared and to what purpose.

White American society is made up of various European ethnic groups which share a common history and sensibility. Black Americans are a racial group which do not share the same sensibilities. The specifics of our cultural history are very much different.

We are an African people who have been here since the early 17th century. We have a different way of responding to the world. We have different ideas about religion, different manners of social intercourse. We have different ideas about style, about language. We have different esthetics.

Someone who does not share the specifics of a culture remains an outsider, no matter how astute a student or how well-meaning their intentions.

I declined a white director not on the basis of race but on the basis of culture. White directors are not qualified for the job. The job requires someone who shares the specifics of the culture of black Americans.

http://blogs.indiewire.com/shadowandact/when-august-wilson-insisted-on-a-black-director-for-a-hollywood-adaptation-of-fences-20140804

 

When August Wilson Insisted on a Black Director for a Hollywood Adaptation of ‘Fences’…

10 Nov

AugustWilsonFrom Tambay A. Obenson:

“It’s truly astonishing, and even depressing that, a long 24 years later, we continue to wrestle with the issue…”

 

For the entire article, click the image.

Dollar Bank buys August Wilson Center for $1,912.50

3 Nov

DSC05886From the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette: “The August Wilson Center for African American Culture on Monday remained in the hands of the bank that bought it at sheriff’s sale earlier in the day.

“Dollar Bank, holder of the center’s $7.9 million delinquent mortgage, purchased the property on Liberty Avenue, Downtown, for $1,912.50 — the taxes and costs associated with the sale — at the public auction. There were no other bidders.”

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